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The lunar date of January 8, on Chinese calendar is Dec 4, Jia Xu Year. 2. I was born on January 8, , so what's my Chinese zodiac? For people.

In critical dialogue with contemporary social theory, Fernando Coronil examines key transformations in Venezuela's polity, culture, and economy, recasting theories of development and highlighting the relevance of these processes for other postcolonial nations. The result is a timely and compelling historical ethnography of political power at the cutting edge of interdisciplinary reflections on modernity and the state.

His chronicle of that visit represents a thorough and elegant account of the mystical connection between Native Americans and the natural world. He presents these Athapascan views of the land—principally of its animals and Koyukon relationships with those creatures—together with a measured account of his own experiences and doubts.

For someone in search of a native American expression of 'ecology' and natural history, I can think of no better place to begin than with this work. He has painstakingly regarded their views of earth, sky, water, mammals and every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

He does admire their love of nature and spirit. Those who see the world through his eyes using their eyes will likely come away with new respect for the boreal forest and those who live with it and in it, not against it. Nelson's presentation also gives rich insights into the Koyukon subsistence cycle through the year and into the hardships of life in this northern region.

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The book is written with both brain and heart. This book represents a landmark: never before has the integration of American Indians with their environment been so well spelled out. Water is a symbol of life, wisdom, fertility, purity, and death. Water also sustains and nourishes, irrigates our crops, keeps us clean and healthy, and contributes to our energy needs. But a strain has been put on our water resources as increased energy demands combine with the effects of climate change to create a treacherous environment.

Individuals and communities around the globe increasingly face droughts, floods, water pollution, water scarcity, and even water wars. We tend to address and solve these concerns through scientific and technological innovations, but social and cultural analyses and solutions are needed as well. In this edited collection, contributors tackle current water issues in the era of climate change using a wide variety of recent literature and film.

At its core, this collection demonstrates that water is an immense reservoir of artistic potential and an agent of historical and cultural exchange. Creating familiar and relatable contexts for water dilemmas, authors and directors of contemporary literary texts and films present compelling stories of our relationships to water, water health, ecosystems, and conservation. They also explore how global water problems affect local communities around the world and intersect with social and cultural aspects such as health, citizenship, class, gender, race, and ethnicity.

This transformative work highlights the cultural significance of water—the source of life and a powerful symbol in numerous cultures. It also raises awareness about global water debates and crises. Consider an empty bottle or can, one of the hundreds of billions of beverage containers that are discarded worldwide every year. Empty containers have been at the center of intense political controversies, technological innovation processes, and the modern environmental movement. Making a Green Machine examines the development of the Scandinavian beverage container deposit-refund system, which has the highest return rates in the world, from to present.

His comparative framework charts the complex network of business and political actors involved in the development of the reverse vending machine RVM and bottle deposit legislation to better understand the different historical trajectories empty beverage containers have taken across markets, including the U. The RVM has served as more than a hole in the wall--it began simply as a tool for grocers who had to handle empty refillable glass bottles, but has become a green machine to redeem the empty beverage container, helping both business and consumers participate in environmental actions.

Nor did she give much thought to the people who would become her neighbors. As it turned out, her life on this urban-wildland frontier was very different from what she had planned. Here, a landscape of rare beauty conceals geological and climatic treachery, and human presence endangers a rich but fragile ecosystem. Malibu Diary combines environmental history, personal memoir, and a meditation on the complicated relationships between humans and the landscapes they destroy. It is also the story of a colorful community, of how change has happened—and why—and what it has meant.

For many environmentalists, managing population growth became the key to unlocking the most intractable problems facing Americans after World War II—everything from war and the spread of communism overseas to poverty, race riots, and suburban sprawl at home. Mammalian Dispersal Patterns examines the ways that social structure affects population genetics and, in turn, rates of evolution, in mammalian groups. It brings together fieldwork in animal behavior and wildlife biology with theoretical work in demography and population genetics. The focus here is dispersal—whether, how, and when individuals leave the areas where they are born.

Theoretical work in population genetics indicates that such social factors as skewed sex ratios, restrictive mating patterns, and delayed age of first reproduction will lower the reproductive variability of a population by reducing the number of genotypes passed from one generation to the next. Field studies have shown that many mammalian species do exhibit many such social characteristics. Among horses, elephant seals, and a number of primates, the majority of females are inseminated by only a fraction of the males.

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In pacts of wolves and mongooses, usually only the highest-ranking male and female breed in a given season. Although socially restricted mating tends to lower genetic variability in isolated populations, it actually tends to increase genetic variability in subdivided populations with low rates of migration between subunits. Among some species there is little dispersal and thus little gene flow between subpopulations; other species travel far afield before mating. The contributors to this volume examine actual data from populations of mammals, the way patterns of dispersal correlate with the genetic structure of individuals and populations, and mathematical models of population structure.

This interdisciplinary approach has an important bearing on work in conservation of both wildlife and zoo populations, for it shows that the home range and the population size needed to maintain genetic variability can differ greatly from one species to the next. The volume also offers a fruitful model for future research. A unique interdisciplinary overview of the way mammals reproduce, this volume synthesizes research done by laboratory physiologists, behaviorists, population ecologists, and animal breeders. Bronson has drawn together the disparate literature in these areas to provide students and researchers with a comprehensive and biologically integrated approach to the study of mammalian reproduction.

Each chapter presents a wealth of issues and questions, summarizing the current consensus on interpretations as well as viable alternatives under debate. The book is principally concerned with how environmental factors regulate reproduction. Bronson proposes that a mammal's reproductive performance routinely reflects simultaneous regulation by several environmental factors that interact in fascinatingly complex ways. Environment is defined broadly, and the chapters give equal weight to ecological and physiological factors when considering how variables such as food availability, ambient temperature, photoperiod, and social cues interact to regulate a mammal's reproduction.

Particular attention is given to seasonal breeding, and a taxonomically arranged chapter underscores the importance of comparative and evolutionary biology to an understanding of mammalian reproduction. Mammalian Reproductive Biology is a powerful argument for the value and importance of interdisciplinary approaches to research. Its almost 1, references constitute the most comprehensive bibliography to date on this topic.

Bronson also gives detailed consideration to promising areas for future research.

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Well organized, carefully planned, and clearly written, this book will become standard reading for scientists concerned with any aspect of mammalian biology. European and American naturalists visited the territory that would become Alabama as early as the late eighteenth century and marveled at the breadth and variety of its flora and fauna. Mammals of Alabama fills the gap.

Naturally occurring in the state are nine orders, twenty-two families, fifty-one genera, and seventy-two species of living mammals. Best and Dusi offer an engaging entry for each as well as additional species that have become extinct through natural processes or human extirpation.

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Best also offers fascinating and fun facts about Alabama mammals that will delight nature lovers of all ages, such as the surprising and excellent tree-climbing skills of the gray fox, the use in the past of mole skins to apply cosmetics, and the litters of identical quadruplets common to the nine-banded armadillo. Published in cooperation with the Alabama Wildlife Federation. Thoroughly revised and updated, Mammals of Colorado, Second Edition is a comprehensive reference on the nine orders and species of Colorado's recent native fauna, detailing each species' description, habitat, distribution, population ecology, diet and foraging, predators and parasites, behavior, reproduction and development, and population status.

An introductory chapter on Colorado's environments, a discussion of the development of the fauna over geologic time, and a brief history of human knowledge of Coloradan mammals provide ecological and evolutionary context. The most recent records of the state's diverse species, rich illustrations including detailed maps, skull drawings, and photographs , and an extensive bibliography make this book a must-have reference. Amateur and professional naturalists, students, vertebrate biologists, and ecologists as well as those involved in conservation and wildlife management in Colorado will find value in this comprehensive volume.

Donald F. Hoffmeister's authoritative guide provides a detailed profile of all the state's mammals, past and present--from the elephant-sized mastodons that roamed the region during the Ice Age and the black bears and bobcats that early Illinois settlers encountered, to the plethora of creatures that now live on the state's prairies, woodlands, and hills.

Outlining how human activities such as hunting and farming have altered the state's terrain and affected numerous species, Hoffmeister discusses which species have been wiped out, which are endangered or threatened, which no longer live in Illinois but survive elsewhere, and which might inhabit the region in the future. In this comprehensive study, now available for the first time in paperback, Hoffmeister briefly characterizes the climate, soils, and vegetation of Illinois, particularly as they affect mammals.

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In addition to detailing mammals known to be present in the area during the Pleistocene and Holocene eras, Hoffmeister identifies each order and family of mammals present in Illinois since Within each family, each species is characterized by habit, habitat, food, reproduction, population, and variation. These entries are supplemented by tables, anatomical drawings, photographs, and Illinois and United States distribution maps.

Enhanced by sixty color photographs, more than one hundred line drawings, and a glossary of scientific terms, Mammals of Illinois is an indispensable resource for students, teachers, biologists, and nature enthusiasts. The second installment in a planned three-volume series, this book provides the first substantive review of South American rodents published in over fifty years. Increases in the reach of field research and the variety of field survey methods, the introduction of bioinformatics, and the explosion of molecular-based genetic methodologies have all contributed to the revision of many phylogenetic relationships and to a doubling of the recognized diversity of South American rodents.

The largest and most diverse mammalian order on Earth—and an increasingly threatened one—Rodentia is also of great ecological importance, and Rodents is both a timely and exhaustive reference on these ubiquitous creatures. From spiny mice and guinea pigs to the oversized capybara, this book covers all native rodents of South America, the continental islands of Trinidad and Tobago, and the Caribbean Netherlands off the Venezuelan coast.

It includes identification keys and descriptions of all genera and species; comments on distribution; maps of localities; discussions of subspecies; and summaries of natural, taxonomic, and nomenclatural history. Rodents also contains a detailed list of cited literature and a separate gazetteer based on confirmed identifications from museum vouchers and the published literature. Now in an extensively revised 3rd edition, Mammals of the Great Lakes Region has been an essential reference for countless amateur and professional naturalists since Species accounts are accompanied by new color photographs plus fully updated distribution maps showing the geographic range in the Great Lakes region and in North America.

A thorough introduction outlines the environmental factors that affect the distribution and abundance of mammals in Great Lakes ecosystems and discusses the impacts of current human activities, including introduction of diseases and climate change. There is also a section on preparing captured specimens for research or teaching, as well as user-friendly keys and quick reference tables to physical measurements and life history data. Brand new in this edition, the book also features detailed illustrations of the tracks of commonly found mammals to assist with year-round identification.

Providing the most up-to-date information on mammals in the Great Lakes basin, this book belongs on the shelves of teachers, students, naturalists, and professional biologists throughout the region. Mammals of the Neotropics satisfies the need for a comprehensive, up-to-date survey of existing knowledge of South America's terrestrial and marine mammals. No comparable account of South American mammals has ever been published in any language, and this timely work will help encourage the research vital to conservation efforts.

This second of a projected three volumes covers southern South America. The authors discuss the historical biogeography and contemporary habitats of the region and then provide individual accounts for nearly indigenous species, including information on size, appearance, ecology, behavior, and life history. Range maps, line drawings, and color plates supplement the text. To place the species accounts in a broader context, the authors consider the diversity of animals within each taxonomic group, examine the Neotropical species from a worldwide geographical perspective, and review taxonomic questions and controversies.


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Two final chapters deal with the community ecology of mammals and the effects humans have had on the mammalian fauna of the southern cone. Despite intense interest in this biologically diverse and ecologically important region, the mammals of South America are still not well known. Filling a large gap in the literature, this volume provides a survey and synthesis of current knowledge of the more than species of land and marine mammals found in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil.

Third in a series that reviewers have described as "state of the art" Journal of Biogeography and "invaluable to anyone interested in the mammalian fauna of the Neotropics" Quarterly Review of Biology , this volume follows the format of its acclaimed predecessors.